Why I don’t get political…

Political ranting, posturing and arguments are a common thing today. Notice I don’t say political debate. Not going to follow that line very far at all, but I am often frustrated at the fact that true political debate doesn’t happen.

And really, the reason it doesn’t happen is because most parties involved have no clue what they are talking about.

I don’t get into political discussions anymore for the following reasons (in order of importance):

1. Over time, I increasingly felt that I wasn’t spending enough time and effort studying issues out through reading and pondering. Thus, I felt like my opinions were incomplete. I won’t defend an opinion that I can’t defend thoroughly.

2. I expected too much from my discussions. From those I disagreed with, I expected no ad hominem attacks, well-thought out and logical opinions, a deference to history, and a sincere desire to truly effect change. This was too much to expect. And on my part, I wasn’t thinking out my opinions well enough.

3. I want to make a difference. Political screeds from all sides were not getting the job done.

4. The GOP and the Democrats, at least those in power, are pretty much the same thing. To paraphrase some well-known statements: Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Once you have power, your focus is to retain that power. Sure, these are very broad statements and there are several people who don’t follow this pattern, but… you get it.

5. I feel too strongly about my country and my opinions to waste my time and energy blaring uselessly. I love this country; I love the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence (I see much of humility, strength of character and reverence in those documents), and I love people.

Okay, with all of that said, there are times I will not hold back. This is one of them. Abortion, overall, sucks.

This is from the Patriot Post:

Faith and Family: It’s a Wrongful Life

This is not the title of the latest Hollywood melodrama, but a term of art recently coined by the Court of Appeals in Brussels. Last week the Court ruled that the parents of a disabled child are entitled to recover damages due to their physicians’ failure to detect the condition in utero, thereby denying its mother the right to a “therapeutic abortion.”

After first determining that the doctors had not caused the disability, the court went on to explain that “the injury [that] must be compensated is not the disability itself, but the fact of being born with such disabilities.” In the court’s opinion, the legislature had authorized therapeutic abortion, not only for the health and well being of the mother, but for the child as well; therefore, on the child’s behalf, the court would rule that it should never have been born.

Belgium is not the first to so rule. In the U.S., such suits are called “wrongful birth,” and there have been thousands of them since Roe v. Wade in 1973. Most of the time, such matters are settled out of court, for no one wants to haul a child before a jury and argue that the child should have been aborted.

Wrongful birth? Seriously?

Yes, I’m religious. Yes, I’m the father of six children (#6 was due yesterday). Yes, I’m a cry baby.

Abortion is the killing of the most defenseless humans on the planet.

Wrongful birth.

Look, I get the point that there are times. And I get the point that free agency is a real thing and people have freedom of choice. And I get the point that the health: mental, physical etc. of the mother is a crucial issue.

We don’t have freedom of choice so we can make the wrong decisions and divest ourselves of responsibility for those wrong choices. We have freedom of choice so that we can demonstrate our understanding of right and wrong and choose right.

About jaredgarrett

Jared Garrett is the author of Beat, a YA scifi thriller, and its forthcoming sequel, both published by Future House Publishing. A new series, debuting in January 2016 and also published by Future House, kicks off with Lakhoni, a fast-paced rescue adventure in a world reminiscent of Aztec culture, to be released in January 2016. He self-published Beyond the Cabin, a novelization of his childhood in a cult, in December 2014. Both Beat and Beyond the Cabin were Whitney Award nominees, and his story Song of the Wind, received honorable mention in the Writers of the Future contest. In addition to writing, he's spent fifteen years in adult education and is an accomplished public speaker and workshop leader.
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